Home Learning What is Scale Drawing and how to do Part 1
What is Scale Drawing and how to do Part 1

What is Scale Drawing and how to do Part 1

0
6


Scale Drawing:

When we are ready to draw in perspective, it is important that we figure ou
the best method to use, according to the type of design we are developing.
In this example, we see a finished rendering of a forklift that is done in
a two-point perspective, which is one of the most common types of
perspective drawing. In the following pages we will discuss the advantages
and disadvantages of using different perspectives, focusing mainly on
analyzing the differences between axonometric, two-point, and three-poin
perspective drawing.1

If we eliminate all color on the forklift,
we get a clear vision of how a twoperspective drawing works. All vertical
elements remain vertical (as seen in
the drawing in red), so the lines do not
converge toward any vanishing point.
There are two main vanishing points:
the left vanishing point (marked in
green) and the right vanishing point
(marked in blue).
As long as lines are parallel, they should
converge in a vanishing point. The cube
on the top left corner shows a simplified
version of this method.
A: In a two-point perspective,
our vertical lines remain vertical.

In the next drawing, we see how
an axonometric view works. An
axonometric view is the generic term
to describe a drawing in which all lines
are parallel, whether they point toward
the left, the right, or remain vertical.
The cube on the top left shows how
the lines marked in green, blue, and
red create a 120-degree grid. In this
situation, the axonometric perspective
would be called an isometric
perspective—this is favored by
architects and interior designers in
many cases, as objects and spaces
tend to favor 90-degree relationships.
On the other hand, industrial designers
would rather use a two-point or even a
three-point perspective if their object
will have angles or curved surfaces.
A: In an axonometric drawing,
all lines are parallel to each other.
Parallel lines do not converge into
a vanishing point.
A
The next drawing points out the
advantages of using a three-point
perspective. The view looks more natural
and closer to what the human eye would
appreciate. Note how the vertical lines
now converge toward a vanishing point,
which could be aiming up or down
depending on the point of view (imagine
drawing a tower while standing at the
base or hovering over the top level,
The next drawing points out the
advantages of using a three-point
perspective. The view looks more natural
and closer to what the human eye would
appreciate. Note how the vertical lines
now converge toward a vanishing point,
which could be aiming up or down
depending on the point of view (imagine
drawing a tower while standing at the
base or hovering over the top level,
looking down).
A: In a three-point perspective drawing,
the vertical lines also converge into a
vanishing point.
The use of a three-point perspective
drawing can dramatically alter our
perception of an object if the vanishing
points are too close to each other.
If we go back and examine each of the
forklifts, we see that our blue and green
lines converge into vanishing points that
are far from the object and each other.
This has an obvious advantage,
which is avoiding distortion or acute
foreshortening. Seasoned rendering
artists and designers tend to separate
their vanishing points from each other
to avoid this. In the example, the forklift
appears to be strangely built, not
because of the design itself but because
of the relative closeness of the vanishing
points. This is even more apparent on
the box drawn on the top left corner.
A: In a forced three-point perspective,
our object appears distorted and
lacks a sense of reality.

Leave a Reply